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Tag: The New Yorker

Well, Since You Asked Me: The Hate That Is Revealing Obama’s Greatness (Jonathan Chait)

Key Take-Away:  It was widely expected that the more distance Obama got from his time in office, we’d have a greater appreciation for what he accomplished. We underestimated the speed which this would occur. Undoubtedly, it’s aided by the sheer dislike and incompetence of The IDIOT, but the fact remains, over time Obama will be judged as a very, very good POTUS. And fortunately the more we see of The IDIOT and his scandals, the more favorable Obama becomes. 

Well, Since You Asked Me: They Went To Jared (Adam Entous/Evan Osnos)

Key Take-Away:  It is clear that Jared Kushner is in way over his head. It is also clear that This Family has used whatever means they can to enrich themselves. I suspect from the belief that they realize this is not going to end well for most of them. And also understanding that they never imagined the opportunity would present itself. Regardless, the clawback of the assets gained during this time, will be very interesting to follow.

Well, Since You Asked Me: Why Not R. Kelly? (Jim DeRogatis)

Key Take-Away from DeRogatis:  Ultimately, though, I believe that there’s one reason above all others that Kelly isn’t facing the same scrutiny as other men in the rogues’ gallery of the moment. It’s one that Karen Attiah, the global-opinions editor of the Washington Post, expressed in a video op-ed, in July. “If even a fraction of the allegations against Kelly are true, his continued success hinges on the invisibility of black women and girls in America,” Attiah says. “As long as black women are seen to be a caste not worthy of care and protection, his actions will not receive widespread outcry . . . . The saga of Robert Kelly says more about America than it does about him.”

Well, Since You Asked Me: A Hard Test for Howard University (Jelani Cobb)

Key Take-Away from Jelani:  The protest and counterprotest reminded me yet again of the apparent paradox at the heart of H.B.C.U.s, where pragmatists are in the business of producingnew generations of fierce idealists. Ralph Ellison’s Bledsoe delighted in the idea that he might alchemize power from deference. Booker T. Washington denounced racial equality to powerful segregationists, but he also secretly funded efforts to defend black civil rights. Howard’s militancy has been underwritten by its compromises.

One afternoon, when I spoke to Frederick by phone, he told me about a student who had harshly criticized his decision to attend the White House meeting, but later came to his office seeking financial assistance to pay for his final year. To Frederick’s mind, the connection between his trip to the White House and his ability to aid the student was obvious. To his critics, such connections either are opaque or come at a cost that betrays the school’s founding mission. “People think we’re doing God’s work, on God’s time, with God’s money,” Frederick said. “The problem is, we don’t have access to the latter two.”

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